Photo
blackpicture:

Gordon Parks Somerville. Maine (1944)

blackpicture:

Gordon Parks
Somerville. Maine (1944)

(via iamapatientboy)

Photoset

hypotheses:

Robert Crumb’s "Heroes Of The Blues" trading cards

(Source: glitteringgoldie, via iamapatientboy)

Photoset

dynamicafrica:

A Brief History and Introduction to Kangas.

Worn mostly by women in the East Africa - mostly Tanzania (including Zanzibar) and Kenya, these large rectangular colourfully-designed cloths, called kangas, are a staple garment for many, mostly in the rural parts of these areas, but are also worn usually by older women in more urban areas.

Having their origins in the 19th century when Swahili-speaking women living along the cost, intrigued by the cotton shawls worn by the Portuguese who controlled the Zanzibar coastline, started buying them in bundles of six and stitched them together in two lengths of three and made them into dresses, kangas have developed into a highly important social aspect of life for many in this part of East Africa.

In the early 20th century, the most noted features of kangas were added when a trader in Mombasa named Kaderdina ‘Abdulla’ Hajee Essak started accenting his kanga cloths with proverbs. Nowadays, most kangas are embedded with a message - often in Swahili - of some sort ranging from political to personal.

Most recently, labels like the London-based British-Tanzanian fashion line Chichia London have begun incorporating kangas in their designs, creating western-inspired garments with a heavy East African touch.

(source)

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

Photoset

dynamicafrica:

ICONIC WOMEN: The Mino of Dahomey or the Dahomey ‘Amazon’ Warriors/Dahomey Amazons.

From the late 17th century until the end of the 19th century, the Kingdom of Dahomey in the what is today the West African nation of Benin (sandwiched between Nigeria on the east and Togo to their west) an incredible regiment made up of only women, from within the Fon community, challenged and refuted gender norms by occupying spaces usually reserved for men. 

This all-women Fon army was originally established by Dahomian king King Houegbadja, the third king of Dahomeny, who ruled from 1645 to 1685, with the intention of having these women serve as elephant hunters known as ‘gbeto’. Later, during Houegbadja’s son King Agadja reign during the early 1700s he developed the gbeto into an established bodyguard and warrior unit who became known as the Mino meaning ‘our mothers’ in Fon - a name given to them by the men’s army of Dahomey. During this time, the Mino gained one of their first major successes in being part of the Dahomey army that defeated the neighbouring kingdom of Savi in 1727. Their incorporation into the army was done to increase the size of the Dahomey military, thus appearing larger and more intimidating to their opponents.

In King Ghezo’s time, between 1818 to 1858, great emphasis was put on Dahomey’s army and military units, perhaps due to the growing threat of the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the threat that neighbouring ethnic groups may have posed as a result of it. As a result, King Ghezo poured much of his resources into developing the Dahomian army, including the Mino, increasing their budget, formalizing their structure and training, and arming them with guns obtained from the Dutch through trade.

It is said that by the mid-19th century there were between 1,000-6,000 women in the Mino unit which comprised of both free Dahomian women and women who may have been taken as captives during war. Women in the Mino, sometimes referred to as ahosi (the king’s wives) were not permitted to marry or have children as the were considered wives of the king. This allowed the women to obtain positions of great power and influence as they were highly revered in Dahomian within the army - especially for their braver, and within society as well.

As European colonial forces began to move more aggressively throughout Africa in the 1800s, French forces on colonial campaigns in West Africa placed increasing pressure on the Dahomian Kingdom leading to an outbreak of war between French and Dahomian forces in 1890. The first Franco-Dahomian War broke out in that year with the Dahomey Army led by anti-colonialist King Behanzin. Part of the French forces consisted of Tirailleurs - French-trained Senegalese and Gabonese soldiers who had been recruited due to their countries being colonized by France. Despite the Dahomian army being greater in number, they were ill-equipped in comparison to the French and lost the war resulting in Dahomey being added to France’s colonial territories in West Africa.

This defeat also signified the disintegration of the Dahomian army and thus the women who the Europeans had referred to as the ‘Dahomey Amazons’. The last surviving Mino is thought to have been a woman named Nawi who died in 1979.

Someone needs to make a sci-fi animated fantasy or make a comic about or inspired by these women.

(sources 1, 2, 3)

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

Photoset

dynamicafrica:

Xhosa Names & Meanings: The “ABC’s of Xhosa Names” by Thandiwe Tshabalala.

South African Illustrator and incredibly talented young creative Thandiwe Tshabalala recently sent me these awesome gifs highlighting and celebrating beautiful names in her mother tongue of Xhosa.

Here’s what she had to say about her series:

"Way back, when apartheid was taking place in South Africa, parents used to give their kids English names so that white people wouldn’t have to struggle pronouncing African names. Most people born during the times of apartheid were given names like: Knowledge, Margaret, Mavis (which has negative connotations), Innocentia, Innocent, Jeffrey, Gloria…eek..Let me just stop there. However, when black folks got their ‘freedom’ back, they went back to naming their children African/South African names."

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

Photo
writeworld:

Writer’s Block
A picture says a thousand words. Write them.
Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.
Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

writeworld:

Writer’s Block

A picture says a thousand words. Write them.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this picture. Write something about this picture.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!

Photoset

fotojournalismus:

Kazuyoshi Nomachi

1- Nuba, Sudan

2- Atbara, Sudan

3- Dallol, Ethiopia

4- Ruwenzori, Uganda

5- Lake Abbe, Djibouti

6- Lake Natron, Tanzania

7- Amhara, Ethiopia

8- Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

9- Dallol, Ethiopia

10- Ruwenzori, Uganda

(via msgondegirl)

Photo
cartermagazine:

Today In History
‘Dorothy Irene Height, National Council of Negro Women President and activist, was born in Richmond, VA, on this date March 24, 1912.’
(photo: Dorothy Irene Height)
- CARTER Magazine

cartermagazine:

Today In History

‘Dorothy Irene Height, National Council of Negro Women President and activist, was born in Richmond, VA, on this date March 24, 1912.’

(photo: Dorothy Irene Height)

- CARTER Magazine

Photoset

africanartagenda:

Chakaia Booker

Country: United States

Style: Expressionist Sculpture

Medium: Rubber tires, metal and wood

Fun Fact: Booker builds her free-standing and wall-mounted sculptures by looping and layering carefully cut sections of tires and rubber tubes onto wood and steel armatures, making sure that the understructure is rarely visible. Drawing on her roots in textile art, she sometimes adapts weaving and tufting techniques to the rubber

Quote:

"I do get up each morning and begin my day sculpting myself," Booker said. "It’s not that it’s a mirroring of exactly what I do (as an artist), but it is about coming to the creative moment right off the start.

"And it starts with me and making my own statement and having my own voice before I get to the studio to continue doing what I do."

Works

1. The Fatality of Hope,

2. "Meeting Ends,

3. Repugnant Rapunzel (let down your hair)

4.

5.

6.

(via black-culture)

Photoset

hypotheses:

Robert Crumb’s "Heroes Of The Blues" trading cards

(Source: glitteringgoldie, via hoodoo-seed)