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serpentskirt:

Painting by Louis Choris (1795-1828)

serpentskirt:

Painting by Louis Choris (1795-1828)

(via hoodoo-seed)

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to-hieron:

vitchellhausen:

directorlazard:

rapeculturerealities:

fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

sweetsugaryshock:

beben-eleben:

For future reference.

Thank you.

For those who would ever need it. -C

reblogging here because i can see this being relevant to anyone who’s ever tried to get out of an abusive relationship

Reblogging because that last comment made me reread the whole thing in a new light and realize this could be vital information. So, putting it out there for everyone, and hoping no one ever really needs it.

>using an OS that doesn’t respect your freedoms
>using closed source sofware
>expecting privacy
I shiggy diggy

^

(via thefemaletyrant)

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art21:

"I don’t think that my work is actually effectively dealing with history. I think of my work as subsumed by history or consumed by history." —Kara Walker

New episode from Art21’s Exclusive series: An in-depth look at the creation of Kara Walker’s monumental public project for Creative Time, A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby (2014), at the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY.

WATCH: Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 Exclusive episode, Kara Walker: “A Subtlety, or the Marvelous Sugar Baby”. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

(via dynamicafrica)

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africanartagenda:

Amary Sobel Diop

Country: Senegal

Apologie pour la paix (Apology for peace): aluminium plates taken from spray deodorants, copper wire, sewing, stitching, courtesy of the artist.

Tawakul Karman : 97 cm x 129
Aline Sitoe Diatta : 80 cm x 106 cm
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf : 103 cm x 129
Leymah Roberta Gbowee : 105 cm x 129 cm
Rigoberta Manchu Tum : 80 cm x 106 cm

A reality of the 21st century announces that the world will acknowledge women as we acknowledge reason. During the 20th and the 21th centuries, women began a fierce struggle for human rights. 
With Apologie pour la paix, Amary Sobel Diop pays tribute to the women of the past few decades responsible for a fragile peace, maintained through their actions: Her Excellence Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and her compatriot Leymah Rigoberta Gbowee of Liberia, Burma’s Aung San Suu KYI, India’s Macedonian Mother Teresa, North Ireland’s Corrigan Mairead, Guatemala’s Rigoberta Menchu Tum, Yemen’s Tawakkul Karman, and Aline Sitoe Diatta of Senegal and the West African sub-region.
Among these remarkable personalities, the Biennale of Dakar chose to show a series of portraits, which include etched biographies of each individual.
The unique technique of stitched-assemblage, used to create each of these works, speaks to the need for uniqueness and to the coordination necessary to restore and to preserve a universal peace, called for by the artist.

Born in 1971 in Diourbel, Amary Sobel Diop lives and works in Senegal. He studied at the Ecole Nationale des Arts of Dakar and became an art teacher in 2009. He intended to be a committed artist as he deals in his works with topical issues such as deforestation, peace culture, restoration and preservation of African cultural heritage, empowerment and enhancement of women. With a rather special technique he calls assembly couture, he retrieves, sew, glue and paint materials to express feelings, emotions and convey messages.

View online : http://sobel12.skyrock.com

http://www.biennaledakar.org/2014/spip.php?article120

(via dynamicafrica)

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thesylverlining:

Please, please share this like wildfire.

My classmate, Susan Hess-Logeais, recently told me about the documentary she’s making called “Soar,” about two amazing young dancers, Kiera and Uriah. It’s incredible, and the young ladies featured in this are astounding, talented, dedicated and extremely important individuals.

Once I heard, I had to share it here. It’s the kind of thing that actually gets attention on tumblr when everybody else ignores it - ignores excellence in black girls, ignores disabled people, and lets them fall by the wayside. So I’m asking, please, please help these girls out, and if not, please reblog and share.

From the “Soar” press release:

"If you’ve ever seen Portland sisters Kiera Brinkley and Uriah Boyd dance together, you know they share a bond that goes beyond sisterhood. 18 year-old Uriah grew up helping Kiera, age 20, adapt after a childhood illness resulted in the amputation of Kiera’s hands and legs just one month after Uriah was born.

“You really have to see them to believe it,” says filmmaker and dancer Susan Hess Logeais. “Kiera can move in ways that are incredibly powerful and graceful, and Uriah is an expressive and talented dancer on her own. But when you see the two of them dance together, you see everything: the struggle, the bond, the joy, the frustration, the mutual love. It’s truly overpowering to watch, and audiences respond pretty intensely.

Hess Logeais is currently fundraising to help pay for the event and finish her film, which she hopes will be eye-opening and inspiring. “We want to change people’s ideas about what is possible,” she says. “For all of us, but especially for the millions of people living with alternate abilities, Kiera shows us what happens when you challenge your limitations. That’s a message I would love to share with as many people as possible.” To find out more about “Soar,” the film, and see some powerful footage of the sisters’ dance, visit the Soar Kickstarter campaign. Kiera, Uriah and Susan are hoping that the disabled community will join the “Soar” community and support their efforts.”

"Soar" has a crowdfunding project going, but it’s having trouble reaching its goal - and this is just too important to let slip. Please help. Signal boost, share, donate if you can, but DO NOT let Kiera and Uriah be forgotten.

THE IMPORTANT LINKS:

The Website:
http://soardocumentary.com/

Crowdfunding:
http://www.seedandspark.com/studio/soar

YouTube: (watch these amazing dancers)
https://www.youtube.com/user/hotflashfilmspdx

Vimeo:
https://vimeo.com/hotflashfilmspdx/videos

THANK YOU so much for reading, and THANK YOU for sharing. This is big, and important, and something good that needs to happen. Thank you.

(via dynamicafrica)

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heytoyourmamanem:

Solomon G. Brown (1829-1906) was the first African American to work at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Hired in 1852 as a laborer, Brown held a number of different roles at the Institution during the 54-year he worked there. Though he lacked a formal education, the self-taught naturalists eventually became a sought-after lecturer and illustrator, as well as a philosopher and poet. Outside of work, Brown worked to improve the lives of African Americans his community. After the Civil War, he founded several schools and churches in the area and served in the D.C. House of Delegates.
Photo: Solomon G. Brown, 1891, Smithsonian Institution Archives (photographer unknown)

heytoyourmamanem:

Solomon G. Brown (1829-1906) was the first African American to work at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Hired in 1852 as a laborer, Brown held a number of different roles at the Institution during the 54-year he worked there. Though he lacked a formal education, the self-taught naturalists eventually became a sought-after lecturer and illustrator, as well as a philosopher and poet. Outside of work, Brown worked to improve the lives of African Americans his community. After the Civil War, he founded several schools and churches in the area and served in the D.C. House of Delegates.

Photo: Solomon G. Brown, 1891, Smithsonian Institution Archives (photographer unknown)

(via yearningforunity)

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thoughtsofablackgirl:

During Mother’s day I was flipping through my parents photo album and saw a picture from when they were dating. 45 years later and still married, I took a shot of them to recreate that pic. They still have the same love, coffee table and ash trays!

thoughtsofablackgirl:

During Mother’s day I was flipping through my parents photo album and saw a picture from when they were dating. 45 years later and still married, I took a shot of them to recreate that pic. They still have the same love, coffee table and ash trays!

(via black-culture)

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dynamicafrica:

The Ultimate African Jazz Cat: Various photographs of Bra Hugh Masakela during his younger days.

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18° 15’ N, 77° 30’ W
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classicladiesofcolor:

Dancers Willa Mae Ricker and Leon James. Both dancers were noted members of Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers.

classicladiesofcolor:

Dancers Willa Mae Ricker and Leon James. Both dancers were noted members of Whitey’s Lindy Hoppers.

(Source: spletnik.ru, via blackhistoryalbum)